Fabrication: History #5

This week I’ll be discussing rubrition, the magic system tied to the circulatory system. The system effects allokinesis, that is, the movement of things other than itself.

I’m still not entirely sure how the rubrite biocyrstal is supposed to work, save that I think it would have a magnetic or agglutinative property — that is, other things stick to it. But it also seems clear to me that, in a similar manner to rosete, it would be able to move, and perhaps would be compelled to move constantly.

One idea is that rosete is semi-liquid, like mercury. But even if it isn’t, it would certainly constantly carry whatever is attached to it. Probably it would develop some kind of grain (as in wood grain) that would designate the direction in which objects attached to it.

This kind of conveyor system and magnetism would certainly not escape the notice of early civilizations, enabling some basic mechanization even in early agricultural cultures. And in addition to this, small portions of rubrite could also function as simple glues or pins, like wall tacky.

Other uses would be transportation, particularly public transportation, as wires of rubrite could be strung along streets for trams or buses.

Any other ideas? Please comment, share your thoughts.

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4 thoughts on “Fabrication: History #5

  1. Mercury isn’t a semi-liquid; it *is* a liquid — just a really dense one. Seeing it in person is really weird because, (if you’re like me,) since you basically never experience anything like it in everyday life, your intuition is completely wrong about it and occasionally insists that the thing you are looking at is impossible.
    Anyway, I prefer the idea of a grain. Maybe like plant stems that move water and small particles from end to end

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